Polymathium: a word coined by author Henry Alfred Goolsbee

PHOTO of Pastor H. Alfred Goolsbee ~ Founder of the Essene Community Church of Life (an IRS approved not-for-profit organization)

PHOTO of Pastor H. Alfred Goolsbee ~ Founder of the Essene Community Church of Life (an IRS approved not-for-profit organization)

The term Polymathium™ is a word coined* by authorHenry Alfred Goolsbee as a compliment to the term polymath.

Wherein polymath is the critical component:
Polymathium is a combination of the words Polymath, Colloquium and Auditorium.

~ Polymathius ~ A Compassionate Man of Ahimsa

~ Polymathius ~ A Compassionate Man of Ahimsa

Polymathium~ Colloquium for the Polymath in all of us.

The Polymathium…is a place where classically minded people can congregate in cyberspace to discuss the “little things” (as opposed to those”big questions”) that make life worth living… returning to the roots of Philosophy, as it were.A polymath (Greek πολυμαθής, polymathēs, “having learned much”) is a person whose expertise spans a significant number of different subject areas. In less formal terms, a polymath (or polymathic person) may simply be someone who is very knowledgeable. Most ancient scientists were polymaths by today’s standards.

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Famous Polymathes of Ancient Times

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Polymath generally ~
“Renaissance Man”
(and why not Renaissance Woman?)

Leonardo da Vinci is regarded as a “Renaissance man” and is one of the most recognizable polymaths.

Leonardo the Vegetarian

Leonardo da Vinci ~ Polymath & Vegetarian

Leonardo da Vinci & Vegetarianism

Leonardo’s love of animals has been documented both in contemporary accounts as recorded in early biographies, and in his Notebooks. Remarkably for the period, Leonardo questioned the morality of eating animals when it was not necessary for health, and consequently became a vegetarian.

Edward MacCurdy (one of the two translators and compilers of Leonardo’s Notebooks into English) wrote:

The mere idea of permitting the existence of unnecessary suffering, still more that of taking life, was abhorrent to him. 

Vasari tells, as an instance of his love of animals, how when in Florence he passed places where birds were sold he would frequently take them from their cages with his own hand, and having paid the sellers the price that was asked would let them fly away in the air, thus giving them back their liberty.”

That this horror of inflicting pain was such as to lead him to be a vegetarian is to be inferred from a reference which occurs in a letter sent by Andrea Corsali to Giuliano di Lorenzo de’ Medici, in which, after telling him of an Indian race called Gujerats [probably a reference to Hindus and Jains (see Jain vegetarianism, vegetarianism and religion) living in Gujarat, a state in India along the Arabian Sea], who neither eat anything that contains blood nor permit any injury to any living creature, he adds, ‘like our Leonardo da Vinci.

The Corsali passage in the original Italian is, ‘Alcuni gentili chiamati Guzzarati non si cibano di cosa alcuna che tenga sangue, né fra essi loro consentono che si noccia ad alcuna cosa animata, come il nostro Leonardo da Vinci…’

more here ~>  http://www.ivu.org/history/davinci/

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Famous Polymathes of Ancient Times

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370 AD

Hypatia ~ Stripped naked and murdered by christian monks in the newly christened Caesarean church

Hypatia ~ Stripped naked and murdered by christian monks in the newly christened Caesarean church in Alexandria, Egypt

Hypatia~ stripped naked & murdered by Christian monks in a newly built church

Hypatia ( /haɪˈpeɪʃə/; Greek: Ὑπατία, Hypatía); born between AD 350 and 370; died March 415) was a Greek scholar from AlexandriaEgypt, considered the first notable woman in mathematics, who also taught philosophy and astronomy. She lived in Roman Egypt, and was killed by a Christian mob who falsely blamed her for religious turmoil.

Maria Dzielska suggests the possibility that Bishop Cyril’s own guard might have been implicated in the murder. The fact that most historians of the fourth century and later were Christians, is, according to Dzielska, the main reason for the scarcity of the sources on Hypatia and the reason that the truth about her death has been covered up.

Some suggest that her murder marked the end of what is traditionally known as Classical antiquity, although others such as Christian Wildberg observe that Hellenistic philosophy continued to flourish until the age of Justinian in the sixth century.

One day in March AD 415, during the season of Lent, her chariot was waylaid on her route home by a Christian mob, possibly Nitrian monks led by a man identified only as Peter, who is thought to be Peter the Reader, Cyril’s assistant.

The Christian monks stripped her naked and dragged her through the streets to the newly Christianised Caesareum church, where she was brutally killed in the church. Some reports suggest she was flayed with ostraca (pot shards) and set ablaze while still alive, though other accounts suggest those actions happened after her death

Definitions

A polymath (Greek πολυμαθής, polymathēs, “having learned much”) is a person whose expertise spans a significant number of different subject areas. In less formal terms, a polymath (or polymathic person) may simply be someone who is very knowledgeable. Most ancient scientists were polymaths by today’s standards.

The terms Renaissance man and, less commonly, Homo Universalis (Latin for “universal man” or “man of the world”) are related and used to describe a person who is well educated or who excels in a wide variety of subjects or fields. The idea developed in Renaissance Italy from the notion expressed by one of its most accomplished representatives, Leon Battista Alberti (1404–1472): that “a man can do all things if he will.” It embodied the basic tenets of Renaissance humanism, which considered humans empowered, limitless in their capacities for development, and led to the notion that people should embrace all knowledge and develop their capacities as fully as possible. Thus the gifted people of the Renaissance sought to develop skills in all areas of knowledge, in physical development, in social accomplishments, and in the arts.

Related terms

A different name for the secondary meaning of polymath is Renaissance man (a term first recorded in written English in the early 20th century). Other similar terms also in use are Homo Universalis (Latin) and Uomo Universale (Italian), which translate to “universal person” or “universal man”. These expressions derived from the ideal in Renaissance Humanism that it was possible to acquire a universal learning in order to develop one’s potential, (covering both the arts and the sciences and without necessarily restricting this learning to the academic fields). When someone is called a Renaissance man today, it is meant that he does not just have broad interests or a superficial knowledge of several fields, but rather that his knowledge is profound, and often that he also has proficiency or accomplishments in at least some of these fields, and in some cases even at a level comparable to the proficiency or the accomplishments of an expert. The related term Generalist is used to contrast this general approach to knowledge to that of the specialist. The expression Renaissance man today commonly implies only intellectual or scholastic proficiency and knowledge and not necessarily the more universal sense of “learning” implied by Renaissance humanism. Note, however, that some dictionaries use the term “Renaissance man” as roughly synonymous with polymath in the first meaning, to describe someone versatile with many interests or talents, while others recognize a meaning which is restricted to the Renaissance era and more closely related to the Renaissance ideals.
A more colloquial term for such a person would be a jack of all trades, though this often refers to skill and not necessarily knowledge. The term “jack of all trades” also occasionally has negative connotation (see, for instance, jack of all trades, master of none), while “polymath” typically has a positive connotation.

The term Universal Genius is also used, taking Leonardo da Vinci as a prime example again. The term seems to be used especially when a Renaissance man has made historical or lasting contributions in at least one of the fields in which he was actively involved and when he had a universality of approach. Despite the existence of this term, a polymath may not necessarily be classed as a genius; and certainly a genius may not display the breadth of knowledge to qualify as a polymath. Teresa of Avila, Albert Einstein, and Marie Curie are examples of people widely viewed as geniuses, but who are not generally considered to be polymaths.

Renaissance ideal

Many notable polymaths lived during the Renaissance period, a cultural movement that spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century, beginning in Italy in the late Middle Ages and later spreading to the rest of Europe. They had a rounded approach to education which was typical of the ideals of the humanists of the time. A gentleman or courtier of that era was expected to speak several languages, play a musical instrument, write poetry, and so on, thus fulfilling the Renaissance ideal. The idea of a universal education was pivotal to achieving polymath ability, hence the word university was used to describe a seat of learning. At this time universities did not specialize in specific areas, but rather trained their students in a broad array of science, philosophy and theology. This universal education, as such, gave them a grounding from which they could continue into apprenticeship to a Master of a specific field. It is important to note that a university education was highly regarded. A person was not considered to need this broad knowledge to apprentice as a carpenter, but to apprentice in the sciences or philosophy it contributed hugely to their being able to comprehend the universe as it was understood at the time. During the Renaissance, Baldassare Castiglione, in his The Book of the Courtier, wrote a guide on becoming a polymath.

Castiglione’s guide stressed the kind of attitude that should accompany the many talents of a polymath, an attitude he called “sprezzatura”. A courtier should have a detached, cool, nonchalant attitude, and speak well, sing, recite poetry, have proper bearing, be athletic, know the humanities and classics, paint and draw and possess many other skills, always without showy or boastful behavior, in short, with “sprezzatura”. The many talents of the polymath should appear to others to be performed without effort, in an unstrained way, almost without thought. In some ways, the gentlemanly requirements of Castiglione recall the Chinese sage, Confucius, who far earlier depicted the courtly behavior, piety and obligations of service required of a gentleman. The easy facility in difficult tasks also resembles the effortlessness inculcated by Zen, such as in archery where no conscious attention, but pure spontaneity, produces better and more noble skill. For Castiglione, the attitude of apparent effortlessness should accompany great skill in many separate fields. In word or deed the courtier should “avoid affectation … (and) … practice … a certain sprezzatura … conceal all art and make whatever is done or said appear to be without effort and almost without any thought about it”.

This Renaissance ideal differed slightly from the “polymath” in that it involved more than just intellectual advancement. Historically (roughly 1450–1600) it represented a person who endeavored to “develop his capacities as fully as possible” (Britannica, “Renaissance Man”) both mentally and physically, and, as Castiglione suggests, without “affectation”. For example, being an accomplished athlete was considered integral and not separate from education and learning of the highest order. Leon Battista Alberti, who was a Roman Catholic priest, architect, painter, poet, scientist, mathematician, inventor, and sculptor, was in addition a skilled horseman and archer.

Recognition of Renaissance Men & Women

Caution is necessary when interpreting the word polymath (in the second meaning or any of its synonyms) in a source, since there’s always ambiguity of what the word denotes. Also, when a list of subjects in relation to the polymath is given, such lists often seem to imply that the notable polymath was reputable in all fields, but the most common case is that the polymath made his reputation in one or two main fields where he had widely recognized achievements, and that he was merely proficient or actively involved in other fields, but, once again, not necessarily with achievements comparable to those of renowned experts of his time in these fields. Such a list should not attempt to be comprehensive or authoritative in any way. To be fair, any list should also include men (and women) such as the Hakeem of the Islamic Golden Age (also known as the “Islamic Renaissance”), and other polymaths from other parts of the world, regardless of race creed or religious tendencies.

Renaissance ideal today

During the Renaissance, the ideal of Renaissance humanism included the acquisition of almost all available important knowledge. At that time, several universal geniuses seem to have come close to that ideal, with actual achievements in multiple fields. With the passage of time however, “universal learning” has begun to appear ever more self-contradictory. For example, a famous dispute between “Jacob Burckhardt (whose Die Kultur der Renaissance in Italien of 1860 established Alberti as the prototype of the Renaissance man) and Julius von Schlosser (whose Die Kunstliteratur of 1924 expresses discontent with Burckhardt’s assessments on several counts)” deals with the issue of whether Alberti was indeed a dilettante or an actual Universal Man; while an 1863 article about rhetoric said, for instance: “an universal genius is not likely to attain to distinction and to eminence in any thing. To achieve her best results, and to produce her most matured fruit, Genius must bend all her energies in one direction; strive for one object; keep her brain and hand upon one desired purpose and aim.”

Since it is considered extremely difficult to genuinely acquire an encyclopedic knowledge, and even more to be proficient in several fields at the level of an expert (see expertise about research in this area), not to mention to achieve excellence or recognition in multiple fields, the word polymath, in both senses, may also be used, often ironically, with a potentially negative connotation as well. Under this connotation, by sacrificing depth for breadth, the polymath becomes a “jack of all trades, master of none”. For many specialists, in the context of today’s hyperspecialization, the ideal of a Renaissance man is judged to be an anachronism, since it is not uncommon that a specialist can barely dominate the accumulated knowledge of more than just one restricted sub-field in his whole life, and many renowned experts have been made famous only for dominating different sub-fields or traditions or for being able to integrate the knowledge of different sub-fields or traditions.

Today, expertise is often associated with documents, certifications, diplomas, and degrees attributing to such, and a person who seems to have an abundance of these is often perceived as having more education than practical “working” experience. Auto-didactic polymaths often combine didactic education and expertise in multiple fields with auto-didactic research and experience to create the Renaissance ideal.

Many fields of interest take years of single-minded devotion to achieve expertise, often requiring starting at an early age. Also, many require cultural familiarity that may be inaccessible to someone not born and raised in that culture. In many such cases, it is realistically possible to achieve only knowledge of theory, without practical experience. For example, on a safari, a jungle native will be a more effective guide than a scientist who may be educated in the theories of jungle survival but did not grow up acquiring his knowledge first-hand.

However, those supporting the ideal of the Renaissance man today would say that the specialist’s understanding of the interrelation of knowledge from different fields is too narrow and that a synthetic comprehension of different fields is unavailable to him, or, if they embrace the Renaissance ideal even more deeply, that the human development of the specialist is truncated by the narrowness of his view. What is much more common today than the universal approach to knowledge from a single polymath, is the multidisciplinary approach to knowledge which derives from several experts from different fields collaborating together.

Polymath and polyhistor compared

Many dictionaries of word origins list these words as synonyms or, as words with very similar meanings. Thomas Moore took the words as corresponding to similarly erudite “polys” in one of his poems titled The Devil Among Scholars:

Off I fly, careering far
In chase of Pollys, prettier far
Than any of their namesakes are —The Polymaths and Polyhistors,
Polyglots and all their sisters.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the words mean practically the same; “the classical Latin word polyhistor was used exclusively, and the Greek word frequently, of Alexander Polyhistor”, but polymathist appeared later, and then polymath. Thus today, regardless of any differentiation they may have had when originally coined, they are often taken to mean the same thing.

PHOTO of Pastor H. Alfred Goolsbee ~ Founder of the Essene Community Church of Life (an IRS approved not-for-profit organization)

PHOTO of Pastor H. Alfred Goolsbee ~ Founder of the Essene Community Church of Life (an IRS approved not-for-profit organization)

The root terms histor and math have similar meanings in their etymological antecedents (to learn, learned, knowledge), though with some initial and ancillarily added differing qualities. Innate in historíā (Greek and Latin) is that the learning takes place via inquiry and narrative. Hístōr also implies that the polyhistor displays erudition and wisdom. From Proto-Indo-European it shares a root with the word “wit”. Inquiry and narrative are specific sets of pedagogical and research heuristics. Polyhistoric is the corresponding adjective. The word polyhistory (meaning varied learning), when used, is often derogatory.

 

*The word Polymathium is a word coined by ‡Elder Henry Alfred Goolsbee.

Published on October 5, 2010 at 7:58 pm  Leave a Comment  

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